Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Finasteride and Tendonitis - from FDA reports

Tendonitis is found among people who take Finasteride, especially for people who are male, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for 1 month, also take medication Propecia, and have Sinusitis.
This review analyzes which people have Tendonitis with Finasteride. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 14,473 people who have side effects when taking Finasteride from FDA , and is updated regularly.


There are interesting presentations of reactions by different groups.
92 percent of people 60 years or older had a tendonitis as a result of finasteride. Tendonosis in my fingers stopped when I stopped finasteride.

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Monday, November 13, 2017

There may be a way to reverse type 2 diabetes

The secret to reversing the effects of type 2 diabetes may lie in calorie intake. The link between a very low-calorie diet and the illness was discovered by a team of researchers from Yale University. For their study, the scientists used rats that had the disease and put them on a calorie-restricted diet where they ate about 25% of their normal food intake.
The study, published in Cell Metabolism, was inspired by the fact that many people with type 2 diabetes achieve remission after undergoing weight-loss surgery — which significantly reduces calorie intake before and after the procedure.
About one in three Americans will have type 2 diabetes by 2050, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Using this approach to comprehensively interrogate liver carbohydrate and fat metabolism, we showed that it is a combination of three mechanisms that is responsible for the rapid reversal of hyperglycemia following a very low calorie diet,” lead author Gerald I. Shulman said in a statement.
In only three days, the rats had significantly lower blood glucose levels, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The new diet decreased the amount of lactose and amino acids in the rats' bodies that became glucose and reduced the rate of liver glycogen-to-glucose. It also helped the rats livers respond to insulin more efficiently through a loss of body fat.
The Yale News said that the next step will be to apply these findings in a human study. “These results,” Shulman said, “if confirmed in humans, will provide us with novel drug targets to more effectively treat patients with type 2 diabetes.”
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Thursday, November 2, 2017

Do I have Alzheimer’s? My journey with a disease that is complex to diagnose

By Michael Ellenbogen, Special to The Washington Post
Twenty years ago, at age 39, I began having memory and cognitive problems. My primary-care doctor and my neurologists said I was stressed and depressed. I also was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, or MCI. Ten years later, I received another diagnosis. Well, really two. One doctor said I had Alzheimer’s disease, and another thought it was semantic dementia.
Alzheimer’s is a devastating chronic neurodegenerative disease. It is a progressive mental deterioration that advances to affect bodily functions such as walking and swallowing, and always leads to death. Semantic dementia leads to losses of vocabulary, fluency of speech and meanings of familiar words. It also is progressive.
After another year of testing, physicians decided that I had Alzheimer’s.
While it was a relief to finally get a diagnosis, I realized that I had been given a death sentence. There is no prevention or cure for Alzheimer’s, and no survivors. Overwhelmed, I decided to help the search for a cure by advocating for Alzheimer’s and dementia.
I got involved with clinical trials and advocacy. My huge network on LinkedIn allowed me to connect with advocates and information. It gave me access to many tests, including gene tests, free. Two contacts, both health-care professionals, even read my medical records and scans and gave me their opinions.
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Friday, October 27, 2017

This Doctor Diagnosed His Own Cancer with an iPhone Ultrasound


Every marketer wants the perfect story to tell. But if you’re in medicine, you don’t want it to be about yourself.
Earlier this year, vascular surgeon John Martin was testing a pocket-sized ultrasound device developed by Butterfly Network, a startup based in Guilford, Connecticut, that he’d just joined as chief medical officer.
He’d been having an uncomfortable feeling of thickness on his throat. So he oozed out some gel and ran the probe, which is the size and shape of an electric razor, along his neck.
On his smartphone, to which the device is connected, black-and gray images quickly appeared. Martin is not a cancer specialist. But he knew that the dark, three-centimeter mass he saw did not belong there. “I was enough of a doctor to know I was in trouble,” he says. It was squamous-cell cancer.
The device he used, called the Butterfly IQ, is the first solid-state ultrasound machine to reach the market in the U.S. Ultrasound works by shooting sound into the body and capturing the echoes. Usually, the sound waves are generated by a vibrating crystal. But Butterfly’s machine instead uses 9,000 tiny drums etched onto a semiconductor chip.
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Sugar and cancer: Is there a link?

Does sugar, which makes all things delicious, lead to cancer?
A biologic mechanism in yeast cells may explain the relationship between sugar and malignant tumors, according to a recent study published in the journal Nature Communications.
The nine-year research project may even influence personal medicine and diets for cancer patients, the authors concluded. The study begins by looking closely at cancer cells' appetite for sugar.
    Scientists understand that cancer cells support their rapid reproduction by rewiring their metabolisms to take glucose, ferment it and produce lactate.

    Conversely, healthy cells continue with normal respiration, a process in which they take glucose and break it down into carbon dioxide and water.
    This "switch of cancer cells from respiration to fermentation is something that was discovered by Otto Warburg, a German biochemist, about 70 or 80 years ago," said microbiologist Johan M. Thevelein, senior author of the study and a professor at KU Leuven in Belgium. It is known as "the Warburg effect."
    Fermentation of sugar to lactic acid produces about 15 times less energy than respiration of sugar, Thevelein noted. Yet cancer cells "grow much more rapidly than normal cells, and yeast actually grows the fastest when they ferment," he noted.
    READ ARTICLE

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017

    Can You Reverse Diabetes?

    Can you change your diabetes fate?

    It's key to understand that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness often preceded by years of elevated blood glucose (also known as blood sugar) levels high enough to be diagnosed as prediabetes. When most people with type 2 diabetes are finally diagnosed, experts believe they've been on this path for five to 10 years and have lost more than half of their natural insulin-making capability in the beta cells of their pancreas.
    While you cannot undo your lifestyle habits of the last decade or more, you can take steps to put your diabetes in remission. Don't despair and don't give up.
    Research shows that losing weight and keeping it off can help delay the onset of prediabetes, delay progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, or slow the progression of type 2. The keys to diabetes prevention and preventing diabetes complications include: Eat healthfully, exercise often, seek out knowledge and support, and create an environment that fosters healthful living.
    Losing even just a few pounds early on when glucose begins to rise can dramatically improve your blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, triglycerides, blood pressure, and more.
    "People should get to their ideal weight if they have prediabetes or type 2," says Robert Huizenga, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles and doctor for The Biggest Loser, where he is known as Dr. H. "People should have no excess fat and be athletically fit. Ninety minutes of exercise six days a week and a steady diet of healthy eating is the best prescription to manage type 2 diabetes without medications."
    That's easier said than done for most people, who have to adopt a healthier lifestyle outside the bubble of the ranch where The Biggest Loser is filmed or the jump-start of a stomach-shrinking surgery. Commitment, perseverance, and a positive attitude can help you achieve a healthy weight. Set small, achievable goals first; experience success of meeting those goals; and then add new goals. Over time, all your small successes will add up right before your eyes.
    Many research studies suggest setting a goal of losing 5-7 percent of your starting weight to lower blood sugar and improve health, with the imperative to keep the pounds off.
    READ ARTICLE

    Tuesday, September 26, 2017

    How Diabetes Drives Atherosclerosis


    March 17, 2008
    Source:
    University of Rochester Medical Center
    Summary:
    Researchers have discovered how diabetes, by driving inflammation and slowing blood flow, dramatically accelerates atherosclerosis. Experts once believed that atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, developed when too much cholesterol clogged arteries with fatty deposits called plaques. When blood vessels became completely blocked, heart attacks and strokes occurred. Today most agree that the reaction of the body's immune system to fatty build-up, more than the build-up itself, creates heart attack risk.

    Researchers have discovered how diabetes, by driving inflammation and slowing blood flow, dramatically accelerates atherosclerosis, according to research to be published in the March 14 edition of the journal Circulation Research.
    Experts once believed that atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, developed when too much cholesterol clogged arteries with fatty deposits called plaques. When blood vessels became completely blocked, heart attacks and strokes occurred. Today most agree that the reaction of the body's immune system to fatty build-up, more than the build-up itself, creates heart attack risk. Immune cells traveling with the blood mistake fatty deposits for intruders, akin to bacteria, home in on them, and attack. This causes inflammation that makes plaques more likely to swell, rupture and cut off blood flow.
    Making matters worse, nearly 21 million Americans have diabetes, a disease where patients' cells cannot efficiently take in dietary sugar, causing it to build up in the blood. In part because diabetes increases atherosclerosis-related inflammation, diabetic patients are twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke.
    Past work has shown that high blood sugar has two effects on cells lining blood vessels as part of atheroslerosis. First, it increases the production of free radicals, highly reactive molecules that tear about sensitive cell components like DNA, causing premature cell death (apoptosis). This process also reduces the availability of nitric oxide (NO), which would otherwise enable blood vessels to relax and blood flow to increase.
    In contrast to diabetes, exercise and good diet bring about faster blood flow through blood vessels. The force created by fast, steady blood flow as it drags along blood vessel walls has been shown by recent studies to protect arteries from atherosclerosis. Physical force has emerged recently as a key player in bodily function, capable of kicking off biochemical processes (e.g. weightlifting thickens bone).
    "Inflammation in blood vessels is one of the main drivers of atherosclerosis, and diabetes makes it much worse," said Jun-ichi Abe, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor with the Aab Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and a study author. "Our study argues that a pathway surrounding a key signaling enzyme both protects the heart in normal cases, and is sabotaged by the chemicals produced in diabetes. We believe we have found a new therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes-related damage to blood vessels."

    READ ARTICLE

    Sunday, September 24, 2017

    Low Brain Cholesterol—Separating Fact from Fiction



    Where do you find the highest concentration of cholesterol in your whole body? In your BRAIN. The brain is cholesterol-rich on purpose—because it needs large amounts of cholesterol to function properly. So, what does that mean for the growing number of people choosing naturally cholesterol-free plant-based diets? And what about the 15 million Americans who take statin medications like Lipitor to lower their cholesterol levels? People who are trying to lower their cholesterol levels are worried about heart health. But how does lowering cholesterol affect mental health?
    What is cholesterol?
    Poor cholesterol—so misunderstood. Cholesterol is a waxy substance naturally embedded in our membranes, the flexible packaging surrounding every cell in our bodies. Cholesterol contributes structural firmness to membranes and keeps them from falling apart. Membranes are not simply protective cell wrappers; they are dynamic, highly intelligent structures that participate in cellular signaling and the transport of substances into and out of cells. Cholesterol is also an essential ingredient in vitamin D and many other hormones in the body, including estrogen and testosterone. All animal foods (meat, seafood, poultry, dairy, and eggs) contain cholesterol because all animal cells need cholesterol. 

    Why does the brain need cholesterol?

    Although the brain represents only 2% of total body weight, it contains 20% of the body’s cholesterol. What is all that cholesterol doing up there? Synapses— the magical areas where communication between brain cells takes place—are lined by cholesterol-rich membranes responsible for passing neurotransmitters like serotonin, GABA, and dopamine back and forth. Myelin, the white matter that insulates brain circuits, is made from tightly-wound membranes containing 75% of the brain’s cholesterol. Cholesterol also helps guide developing nerve endings to their destinations on “lipid rafts”. If the brain is too low in cholesterol, its membranes, synapses, myelin and lipid rafts can’t form or function properly, bringing all brain activity—including mood regulation, learning, and memory— to a screeching halt.

    Do people who take statin drugs need to worry about low brain cholesterol? 

    YES. “Statins” are drugs designed to lower your level of LDL cholesterol—the so-called “bad cholesterol.” They work by turning down the activity of HMG-CoA reductase, the enzyme our cells use to build new cholesterol molecules. Unfortunately, statins do cross the blood-brain barrier and enter brain cells, where they reduce the brain’s natural ability to make the beautiful cholesterol molecules the brain needs to do its important work.
    We used to think that only certain statin drugs could cross into the brain, but it turns out that they ALL do; it’s just that some reach higher levels inside the brain than others. But don’t let that lull you into a sense of false security—even Pravastatin (Pravachol), which has the hardest time making the journey, penetrates the brain enough to interfere with its cholesterol factory. 
    There haven’t been many human experiments testing the effects of statins on brain function, but the few that have been done suggest there is a real risk of cognitiveproblems in some people:
    “RCTs [randomized controlled trials] on effect of statins and cognitive function have shown debatable and controversial results with three RCTs reporting poorer performance scores in a minority of cognitive tests among statin users. Hence, we conclude that there is a need for more randomized control trials and until then benefits of statins must be weighed against the risks of cognitive decline on an individual basis.” [Chatterjee S et al 2015 Curr Cardiol Rep 17:4]
    All statin manufacturer package inserts include the same warning:
    “There have been rare postmarketing reports of cognitive impairment (e.g., memory loss, forgetfulness, amnesia, memory impairment, confusion) associated with statin use. These cognitive issues have been reported for all statins. The reports are generally nonserious, and reversible upon statin discontinuation, with variable times to symptom onset (1 day to years) and symptom resolution (median of 3 weeks).” 
    Nonserious? Seriously? I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t want any of those side effects. They say they are rare, but “post-marketing” reports tend to be rare, because most people don’t report side effects directly to the manufacturer. If you feel fuzzy-headed on a statin, trust your experience over the fine print. Stop the statin and see for yourself if the fog lifts. 

    Statins and Heart Disease

    Stop the statin?! What about high cholesterol and heart disease? Won’t millions of arteries across the country slam shut?
    Statins are a bad idea —not just because they can gum up your brain, slow your hormone production, reduce your coenzyme Q10 levels, cause muscle pain, and put you at risk for other potential side effects, but also because they may not even reduce your risk for heart attacks. Prominent cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra agrees: heart disease is NOT about cholesterol or saturated fat.
    Heart disease is about insulin resistance (aka pre-diabetes) and inflammation within your blood vessels. Diets high in refined carbohydrates (like sugar, flour, cereals and fruit juice) can lead to abnormally high insulin levels. It just so happens that insulin boosts the activity of your cholesterol-building enzyme, HMG-CoA-reductase—the very same enzyme that statin drugs suppress! [Nelson DL, Cox MM. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. 5th ed. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman; 2008:842.]

    READ ARTICLE
     

    Monday, September 18, 2017

    Surgical Castration Instead of Drugs in Prostate Cancer

    For some men with metastatic prostate cancer, surgical castration to remove the testicles (orchiectomy) could be a better option than "chemical castration" achieved by long-term use of prostate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist products, as it may carry less risk for adverse events, suggests a new study published online December 23 in JAMA Oncology.
    "The paradigms of treatment for advanced prostate cancer are ever changing, but there remains a group of men who require permanent castration. For those men, orchiectomy is a reasonable alternative that is associated, according to our study, with lower risks of fractures, peripheral arterial disease, and cardiac-related complications than GnRH agonists," commented lead author Quoc-Dien Trinh, MD, from Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts.
    "Unfortunately, for a multitude of reasons, most of which are unjustified, urologists and medical oncologists no longer offer the option of orchiectomy," he continued. "This is in spite of guidelines continuing to recommend orchiectomy as a first-line treatment for men presenting with metastatic prostate cancer."

    For the last 50 years, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone of treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, the authors write.
    However, achieving androgen deprivation by bilateral orchiectomy has basically been eliminated from clinical practice, mainly because of aesthetic and psychological issues, but also because medical therapy is reversible and easy to administer, the authors write.
    The current standard of care is long-term use of GnRH agonist products such as goserelin (Zoladex, AstraZeneca) and leuprolide (Lupron, AbbVie).
    However, there is mounting evidence that androgen-deprivation therapy is linked to significant adverse effects, such as cardiovascular events, diabetes, acute kidney injury, and bone loss, the authors write. The US Food and Drug Administration requires that GnRH agonist product labeling include a warning about the increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
    Past research looking at adverse cardiac events associated with GnRH agonist products has suggested there is a lower cardiac risk in patients with orchiectomies. That led to the hypothesis that cardiac adverse effects may be related to GnRH agonist products, rather than androgen deprivation per se.
    READ ARTICLE

    Saturday, September 9, 2017

    Muscle Growth and Estrogen

    Estrogen is often called a “female hormone,” which is a misnomer, as this steroid hormone is also produced in the male body. It’s also true that women produce far greater amounts of estrogen than men, just as men produce about 10 times more testosterone than women.
    Men’s greater testosterone levels are often cited as the reason that they are able to build more muscle than women. Recent studies, however, show that despite the negligible amounts of testosterone they produce while weight training, women are able to make similar muscle gains to men’s. That relates more to the fact that anabolic hormones produced during exercise don’t have as great an effect on muscle growth as was previously realized. Think about that the next time you read an article about the best ways to boost anabolic hormones during training.
    If men’s bodies produce estrogen, what is the purpose? After all, nature is not known to be profligate in its actions; everything it does, it does for a reason. Although the precise functions of estrogen in men aren’t entirely clear, it appears to play a role in the maturation and development of sperm, which means that estrogen may effect male fertility.
    Estrogen is vital to bone development in women, and a lack of it in older women often results in osteoporosis, a bone-thinning disease. Some scientists suggest that estrogen may play a similar role in men. Men deficient in testosterone are also subject to osteoporosis, although it’s not as common in men as in women, and when it does occur, it usually strikes in the spine.
    Men are often advised not to take supplements or drugs that lower estrogen for extended times because of possible adverse affects on the cardiovascular system. That’s based on the established cardiovascular protection offered by estrogen to women. Younger women rarely suffer from heart attacks or strokes, and the reason is attributed to their higher estrogen levels. Estrogen offers cardiovascular protection in several ways. For one thing, it aides the synthesis and release of nitric oxide.

    READ ARTICLE

    Sunday, July 2, 2017

    Secrets to Alzheimer's, ALS and Parkinson's Disease: Dr. Paul Alan Cox at TEDxJacksonHole

    Published on Oct 31, 2012
    Paul Alan Cox is a Harvard Ph.D. who has searched for new medicines from plants used by traditional healers in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. For these efforts TIME magazine named him one of 11 "Heroes of Medicine." His efforts in preserving island rain forests were recognized with the Goldman Environmental Prize.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x=independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

    Unconventional But Effective Therapy for Alzheimer's Treatment: Dr. Mary T. Newport at TEDxUSF

    When Dr. Newport's husband Steven was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's, as a Doctor herself, she explored routine treatment options. But when his symptoms became so severe that he was not able to participate in clinical trials, her scientific deductions led to coconut oil, which has led to amazing results.

    Mary T. Newport, M.D. grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was educated at Xavier University and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She is board certified in pediatrics and neonatology, training at Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, and Medical University Hospital in Charleston, SC. She is founding director of the newborn intensive care unit at Spring Hill Regional Hospital, practicing full-time through All Children's Specialty Physicians and volunteer clinical faculty at University of South Florida. She was also founding director of the neonatal intensive Care unit at Mease Hospital Dunedin.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

    CLICK TO SEE THE VIDEO

    Thursday, June 22, 2017

    Extra virgin olive oil staves off Alzheimer's, preserves memory

    Temple University research shows extra-virgin olive oil protects against memory loss, preserves the ability to learn and reduces conditions associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Researchers at the college's Lewis Katz School of Medicine found mice with EVOO-enriched diets had better memories and learning abilities compared to the rodents who didn't eat the oil.

    The real effect of EVOO appeared in the inner-workings of the mice's brains. Neuron connections in the brain were better preserved in those on an EVOO diet.

    Also, olive oil reduces brain inflammation and activates the autophagy process, whereby intracellular debris and toxins are removed. Such debris and toxins are firm markers of Alzheimer's disease. A reduction in autophagy, researchers claim, is suspected to be the beginning of Alzheimer's disease.

    Olive oil is the cornerstone of the Mediterranean diet, which is praised for its various health benefits. This study, which was published Wednesday in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, adds to that previous research.

    "The thinking is that extra-virgin olive oil is better than fruits and vegetables alone," said senior investigator Domenico Pratico, a professor at the Lewis Klein School of Medicine. "As a monounsaturated vegetable fat, it is healthier than saturated animal fats."

    The two groups of mice didn't differ in appearance after months on their respective diets. The mice were tested at 9 and 12 months with those on an EVOO diet testing better on working and spatial memory and learning abilities.

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the United States and affects a person's thought, memory and language. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the disease typically starts after age 60 with mild memory loss. There is no cure.

    Alzheimer's cases are on the rise. In 2013, 5 million Americans had the disease. That number is expected to triple to 14 million by 2050.

    Pratico said the "exciting" finding sets researchers up for another experiment. The next step is to introduce EVOO later in the aging process.

    "Thanks to the autophagy activation, memory and synaptic integrity were preserved, and the pathological effects in animals otherwise destined to develop Alzheimer's disease were significantly reduced," Pratico said. "We want to know whether olive oil added at a later time point in the diet can stop or reverse the disease."
    READ ARTICLE

    Wednesday, June 14, 2017

    Aspirin 'major bleed' warning for over-75s

    People over 75 taking daily aspirin after a stroke or heart attack are at higher risk of major - and sometimes fatal - stomach bleeds than previously thought, research in the Lancet shows. Scientists say that, to reduce these risks, older people should also take stomach-protecting PPI pills.
    But they insist aspirin has important benefits - such as preventing heart attacks - that outweigh the risks. And they warn that stopping aspirin suddenly can be harmful. Anyone with concerns should speak to a doctor before considering changing medication, they say.

    'Lifelong pills'

    Doctors in the UK generally prescribe daily aspirin (75mg) for life after a person has a stroke or heart attack to help prevent more attacks. But researchers have known for some time that aspirin can increase the risk of stomach bleeds.
    Until now, most research involved people under 75, showing that the risk of serious bleeds was low in this group. But with around half the people on lifelong aspirin in the UK now over 75, researchers at Oxford University decided to find out whether the benefits still outweigh the risks in this group.
    Their study followed 3,166 patients who had previously had a stroke or heart attack and were prescribed aspirin or similar blood-thinning drugs. They found that, for patients aged under 65, the annual rate of disabling or fatal bleeds was less than 0.5% (around one person in every 200 people taking the medication). Meanwhile, for people aged 75 to 84, this rose to three people having major bleeds in every 200.
    READ ARTICLE 

    Wednesday, December 7, 2016

    DES causes birth defects & transgender development

     Diethylstilbestrol (DES) was the first synthetic estrogen to be created. Never patented, it was cheap and easy to produce, so DES was made by hundreds of drug companies in the U.S. and around the world. DES was prescribed to millions of pregnant women in the mistaken belief that it could prevent miscarriage. It did not work but instead, DES harmed the mothers, the children born of those pregnancies and possibly the grandchildren and beyond.
    DES Action USA for more information


    DES was prescribed to millions of pregnant women, primarily from 1938 – 1971, but certainly not limited to those years. In some cases DES prescriptions were written into the 1980s in the U.S., as well as other countries, in the mistaken belief the drug prevented miscarriage and ensured a healthy baby. But it didn’t work and instead DES harmed the mothers who were prescribed it, the children born of those pregnancies and now possibly their grandchildren and beyond.
    Never patented, DES was cheap and easy to produce, so hundreds of drug companies made it in the U.S. and around the world. DES was marketed under numerous brand names.
    DES was prescribed if a woman had a previous miscarriage, diabetes, or a problem pregnancy with bleeding, threatened miscarriage or premature labor.
    READ ARTICLE 


    Gynecologist's Guide for treating DES Daughters  

    Saturday, November 26, 2016

    USA CAUSES OF DEATH - INTERACTIVE CHART



    Compare with other nations, etc...

    Chart ranks total deaths for the top 50 causes by age and gender. Rank is determined by official CDC final death total and certain causes such as types of heart disease and cancer are split out for age adjusted death rate rankings to give you an expanded view of what actually takes place. For this reason they will not always match rankings for top 15 causes for age adjusted death rates which use a different combination of ICD-10 Codes.

    You can click on any cause to highlight it to make it easy to follow as you change ages or select a different gender. To remove highlight click the cause again. Use buttons in center to select gender and Use Green Links to sort by age range. Note how the cause of death column rankings change. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see population by age range selected. Use Drop Down at top left of Page to see this chart and other data for individual states. Citation is at the bottom of page.

    SEE INTERACTIVE CHART

    Friday, September 16, 2016

    Recovery from Tendonosis and Tendonitis

    My tendon damage was caused by a disagreement with Keflex, but many have tendon and muscle damage from Statins, Cipro or other drugs. I am nearly recovered after several years and I see no reason my experience wouldn't help others. I am still a work in progress, but I am increasingly optimistic.

    Nearly five years ago I had surgery in Bangkok from an excellent doctor. However, I got a rare bacterial infection that became evident when I returned home.  Normally, Ciprofloxacin would have been prescribed. However, in my case a previous medical provider thought I had reacted adversely to Cipro and so Keflex on a PICC line was prescribed. The PICC line was inserted into my right arm and threaded into a main artery. I was given Keflex in syringes to be injected into the PICC line. Keflex couldn't kill the infection.

    Keflex is in the Cephalosporin family and I am now allergic to this as well. Later my urologist told me I needed to use Cipro and after 28 days at 250 mg the infection was gone. I avoided the 500 mg strength to mitigate possible additional damage to my tendons.  It seems that I was not allergic to Cipro and have used it since. If only that earlier error could have been avoided.  Everyone is different and some react to Cipro. But, Keflex damaged my tendons and it seems to have affected the cardiac pacemaker function causing arrhythmia which fortunately is not too serious.  A cardiac treadmill nuclear medicine study of my heart showed it worked well under load so I was able to avoid a pacemaker after consulting an Electro Kinesiologist, an advanced specially for cardiologists. Some arrhythmia patients may show progress with time and exercise and this seems to be my case.   

    Tendonitis and Tendonosis are common physical conditions that cause discomfort and can be crippling. Both involve the tendons, and can be caused by physical exertion and modern medicines. Tendonitis can often be cured more easily, but tendonosis is less well understood and its effects can last a lifetime. First, let's address the structure of tendons which is necessary to understanding the difference and treatment of these two conditions.

    Tendons consist of a tough central cord surrounded by a sheath. There is little blood circulation so healing time can be lengthy as blood is central to transporting nutrition needed for healing. The cord is composed of chains of cells aligned end to end to support stress of movement and exercise. One might envision this is like a cable suspending a bridge with many threads of wire held together to support great weight.

    On one hand, we may have tendonitis which is caused by overuse. This can be remedied by not using that area as much.  Tendonitis is an irritation between the central cord and the sheath. With lessened use that area will often cure itself. Otherwise a doctor may be needed.

    When the tendon is damaged by statin drugs or antibiotics it can cause crippling injury which can confine the victim to a wheelchair. Often this is mislabeled as tendonitis and this obscures understanding and rehabilitation. Tendonosis is a much more serious malady.  Statins and powerful antibiotics can damage cells including tendons and muscles. Tendons connect muscles to bones and when they are damaged one can be crippled or at least in pain. I've had tendonitis in my right ankle from statins and no longer take them.

    The first symptom of my tendonosis was pain in the tendons behind each knee. We didn't understand and treated it as though it was tendonitis and walked less although there was mild pain. I stopped Keflex, but the damage was done and through Dr. Google, I discovered it was tendonosis, not tendonitis. I saw several doctors who didn't mention tendonosis and I later read that this is often misdiagnosed as tendonitis. My hands also had tendon issues which fortunately are nearly resolved.

    I bought a walker so I could ambulate about the house, but the pain got worse so I became dependent on a wheelchair for a few months.  I became discouraged that I would ever recover. I dearly missed my 5-mile daily walks and began to research on power-chairs. My wife wouldn't give up and strongly discouraged me from buying  one so I continued using the manual chair and in time began to use the walker again. Over time, I gradually recovered my tendons so they no longer hurt. My favorite topical for pain was menthol gel 2.5% that I got at our local 99 cent store. I had other things, but this was the best for me. I often lived with pain preferring to avoid possible additional drug reactions.

    As my tendons hurt less I became more mobile and began to go to our gym. I live in a 55+ community and we have a variety of equipment. The medical provider referred me to a physical therapist who said the pain was due to a need to stretch. Well stretch, I did, and perhaps that helped, but it certainly didn't improve my condition. They really didn't understand my condition. My tendons were damaged and needed to heal and be rehabilitated so they would regain their tensile strength.

    I needed to gradually exercise without straining tendons or my now flaccid muscles. It was a process of try and fail, sometimes overdoing and causing myself a relapse of a couple weeks. I gradually figured it out and tried doing less than what I thought I could. Because of the damage to the tendon cord, the cells evidently did not align and link into a chain as they heal according to one article. They need mild stress, but excessive tension initially caused some strain. I assume muscle cells link in a similar manner. When strain is excessive, the tendon may part and require surgical intervention. Some materials may yield under stress, but tendons are built for strength and do not seem to demonstrate significant plasticity. When I over-exercised, I assumed the pain was from damaged cells and rested until the pain stopped. I gradually learned and recovery has been gradual.

    I needed to pick the equipment I would use. I chose the rowing machine as it can provide a gentle workout without requiring me to carry my body, thus avoiding damaging strain on the knee tendons. Rowing also helped my heart, arms and back which hadn't been used much. As time went on, the pain in my tendons gradually subsided and I gradually walked more. First with the walker and then without. We still use the walker to more groceries from the garage to the kitchen, but I hope I never again to need it to walk.

    The rowing machine also helped rebuild my legs and I continually discovered "new" muscles I didn't know I had. Gradually, this subsided and I began to use other machines. Gradually, gradually, careful to not cause strain, but encourage rehabilitation. Once, I walked two miles, a major victory, but my leg muscles complained, but in time, I should be back to my 5-mile daily walks and begin to lose the extra 20 pounds I gained.

    It has often been discouraging, but I am recovering and I have more confidence to diet more effectively. I hope all of this is helpful. If you have tendon or muscle damage from statin drugs, keep the faith. You too, very likely, with patience and care can improve your tendon and muscle condition. Patience, patience... gradual, gradual is the pace I learned.

    Now, I have learned that finasteride can slow healing. It is often prescribed for men to slow or stop growth of the prostate which grows around the arithera and compresses it causing difficulty passing urine. It converts testosterone into products which will not encourage prostate growth thus it is not recommended for women. Since my surgery eliminated my testosterone production it is no longer appropriate for me. Recently I noticed a psychological effect and researched the drug. I no longer take it.  I notice my tendons seem to be healing faster now although tendons heal very slowly due to poor blood circulation within tendons.

    Wednesday, July 6, 2016

    Good fats can cut risk of death by 27%, study says


    "Bad" fats include trans fats and saturated fats. Saturated fats are common in the American diet, in red meats and full-fat dairy. Research in this area has been mixed, with some studies finding that whole-milk dairy products could be linked to less body fat and obesity, possibly because they promote feelings of fullness and therefore less is consumed. A recent study associated dairy and butter with lower rates of diabetes, although it still found a 1% higher risk of death per tablespoon of butter.
    Trans fats are the major culprit when it comes to health problems. Though they can be found naturally in small amounts in meat and dairy products, the major sources are from artificial trans fats used in processed foods.
    The Food and Drug Administration banned trans fatsfrom products in 2013, but they can still be found in many foods like crackers, cookies, doughnuts, muffins, pies and cakes, often in trace amounts that quickly add up. Research from the Harvard School of Public Health has showed that the risk of heart disease rises by 23% for every 2% of calories obtained from trans fats.

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    Friday, June 10, 2016

    Understanding The Liver and Cholesterol

    And come to the liver, one of my favorite organs. Certainly the heart, the brain, and the immune system get more play in the popular imagination than the liver, but that's only because the liver is so misunderstood. Next to the skin, the liver is the largest organ in the body. In many ways, it is the most important organ, and the last to be considered when it comes to health. In addition to being large, the liver is also a complicated organ involved in at least 200 separate functions. Generally speaking, the liver performs a vital role in regulating, synthesizing, storing, secreting, transforming, and breaking down many different substances in the body. In this issue, we explore the anatomy and physiology of the liver in detail from a natural health perspective, and conclude with a discussion of how the body regulates cholesterol and why statin drugs may not be all that doctors promote.

     As I mentioned above, the liver is the heaviest and largest gland inside the body, weighing in at about 3 pounds. Only your skin (also a single functioning organ) is larger. Your liver occupies almost the entire right upper quadrant of the abdominal cavity. (Remember that in virtually all medical diagrams, right and left are reversed.) It nestles up against the diaphragm on the top and against the ribs on the right -- stretching across the body, almost touching ribs on the left. Thus, barring extreme trauma such as bullet wounds and automobile accidents (or if it is not enlarged), it is fully protected -- a testament to how important the body considers the organ.

     Physically, it is divided into four lobes, a large right and a small left lobe. Nestled between those two lobes are two less easily visible lobes, the quadrate lobe sitting on top and the caudate lobe sitting just underneath and extending to the bottom of the liver.

     Obviously, a three pound organ cannot just "hang" in the abdominal cavity. It needs to be secured.  And in fact, it is suspended from the back of the diaphragm by two ligaments, the falciform and the suspensory ligaments. The falciform ligament in particular runs up through the entire liver, dividing the left and right lobes before attaching to the diaphragm. There is one other interesting note about the falciform ligament. The umbilical vein, when you are inside the womb, runs from the umbilical cord up between the left and right lobes of the liver. Within a week of birth, that vein is completely obliterated and replaced by the fibrous cord known as the falciform ligament.

     The liver has a reserve capacity of some 50-80%. That means you can destroy up to 80 percent (and in some cases possibly even more) of the liver's function and have no demonstrable negative symptoms. And as amazing as that is, it's not the most amazing part. As I have mentioned frequently over the years when talking about detoxing the liver, the liver is one of the few human organs that can regenerate itself. It can actually regenerate (in a matter of weeks) up to an 80% loss of tissue. Once regenerated, it will fill the same space it occupied before, and will take roughly the same shape as before. And when it's done regenerating, it stops! Though it grows faster than any cancer known to man, its regeneration does not become malignant, and the liver will stop growth at approximately its normal size. This is particularly useful after trauma such as an automobile accident that has damaged part of the liver. The damaged or diseased tissue can be removed by the surgeon with no loss of liver function, and in a matter of a few weeks, the liver will have regenerated all of its lost tissue. You've gotta love this stuff!
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